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I can't swim, ride a bike or do a forward roll...

February 6, 2016

I can't swim, ride a bike, do a forward roll.....

 

I can't do these things not because I haven't tried or I am lazy but because I have a condition known as Dyspraxia. 

 

Dyspraxia is a condition in the family of developmental coordination disorder (DCD) . The word Dyspraxia is of Greek origin. The part -Dys means ill and -praxis means doing. Therefore it means ill doing.

 

Definition of dyspraxia is “ an impairment of immaturity of the organisation of movement” which is where it gets its other name Clumsy child syndrome.

 My brain can’t process information correctly therefore causing signals from the brain to parts of the body to be misinterpreted. Me and my fellow dyspraxics  have trouble planning our movements and co-ordinating our bodies to make those movements. We therefore have no ultimate knowledge of what our bodies can do.

 

There is no cure for dyspraxia it is a life long condition, when children become adults they have to learn how to adapt the world around them to fit in with their dyspraxia.

 

So not all people with dyspraxia have the same symptoms. So what makes me dyspraxic then……

  • The main definition of my dyspraxia is I have an unusual gait - meaning how my hips move to make me walk. Therefore it affects my physical ability and I struggle with tasks such as running, skipping, going up and down stairs. 

  • Poor balance - so can appear clumsy or bump into things. Have even been told I look drunk when I’m completely sober!! 

  • Poor hand/eye co-ordination -  so struggle with throwing and catching. Easiest way to describe it is playing rounders I couldn’t time my swing right to hit the ball I’d completely miss it 

  • Poor muscle tone -  Meaning my muscles aren’t as strong as they should be. So I can’t always stand or sit for too long. I’m constantly moving round. I also suffer really bad cramp and my knees lock at least once a day 

  • Socially/Emotionally - . I find it hard to keep my emotions in check. Can’t always take jokes as jokes. When I was younger I had low self esteem and confidence though as I’ve got older my confidence has defiantly improved. 

  • Loud noises -  My main one is balloons popping, it’s so bad I really don’t even like being in same room as balloons. I’m getting better with loud environments once I started going out and going to concerts. 

  • Right sided -  I do everything with my right side first. Even the simplest of tasks or movements using my left side can prove difficult or look awkward. 

I can also talk in terms of good days and bad days….I tweet a lot about these days. 

 

This is a summary of dyspraxia  in other blogs on my own blogs and this one  I will talk in more details about the points above and how they affect me. Also about my campaigning  to change people’s perception on people with dyspraxia and other hidden disabilities.

 

You see dyspraxia is a condition that affects every area of your life but I've learned to accept it and I suppose it makes me….ME 

 

Thank you for reading

 

Amy 💜

 Amy Wright. 24.South Scotland.Dyspraxic.Open University Student.Disability Campaigner.Checkout Girl. 1/2 Team Max. Dream of being a Primary Teacher. Only one in my house!
 
I am passionate about showing the public that young people with disabilities can achieve their goals and be a part of the community. I do this through being the Chair of Board of Directors of The Usual Place. The Usual Place is a cafe with a difference it offers young people with disabilities and additional support needs the opportunity to get training and experience in the hospitality and retail industry. As well as being on the Board of Directors of DG Voice and a supporter of Inclusion Scotland - the voice of disabled people in Scotland. 


You see I have developmental dyspraxia which is an unseen disability, there is no cure for it, I just have to get on with it. Dyspraxia affects every part of everyday life.


Day to day I work at Tescos on checkouts and I have been at the store 6 years. I am also an Open University Student studying course 4 of an Open Degree. 


I lost my mum when I was 8 years old back in 2000, she died of a sudden stroke. I lost my Dad in November 2010, after a 7 year battle with 3 types of cancer.... I was 18 and had lost both my parents.


If I have a moment to spare I am one half of Team Max on Twitter supporting the actor Max Bowden. Quite often away on an adventure across the country seeing him. 

 

If you want to read more about how it is to be dyspraxic then follow my blog -
Also follow me on Twitter - @XxAmyxPopxX 
Feel free to drop me a tweet or DM about anything. 

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